Watermelon Sangria Slush

Posted on Dec 16 2016 - 11:40am by Barry C. Parsons

Watermelon Sangria Slush – an easy economical, refreshing and festive cocktail idea that’s great for every occasion from Holiday parties to summer barbecues.

Watermelon Sangria Slush

Watermelon Sangria Slush

I came up with this idea for Watermelon Sangria Slush because of the approaching Holiday season. Watermelon in winter, why not? Watermelon is available year round nowadays and I especially like to use it in alcoholic and non alcoholic drinks because of it’s light refreshing flavour.

Watermelon reminds me of childhood summers. My Dad would bring home a giant melon, and on a hot summer afternoon, he’d take it from the fridge and cut it in thick slices for all six of us kids. That first sweet bite of watermelon always takes me back to those summer afternoons.

The truth is though, that dear old Dad was always trying to save a buck! With six hungry kids, watermelon was one of the least expensive ways to get some good nutrition into all those growing bodies. Pound for pound, it still is a great economical choice for today’s families, even in winter when it is a bit more expensive but still provides a lot of individual servings. Dad also probably wasn’t aware of the real nutritional value in all those watermelons he brought home. Watermelon is a great source of Vitamin C, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin A.

Now, let’s be serious, I’m not presenting a cocktail as  the next big health drink, but if you are going to indulge, you might as well get a few vitamins and antioxidants in there while you enjoy the party. 😉 

My daughter and I eat the most watermelon in our family; we love it and eat tons of it.  It almost always makes its way into healthy fruit salads for dessert for the whole family too. We also very often incorporate it into tossed salad where it is just delicious paired with feta cheese and a balsamic dressing. Try that one, trust me!

“Slush” is a bit of a modern day tradition here in Newfoundland and many people have their own special recipes. The concept is basically the same in all of them; alcohol is mixed with fruit juices and sugar to form a fine ice crystal slushy base which is made well in advance and kept in the freezer until ready to serve. 

It is a real staple now at Christmas parties around here, and for good reason too, because it is so versatile and can serve quite a number of people quite economically. The slushy frozen base is always mixed with club soda, ginger ale or lemon-lime soda; whatever you like..

The ratio of slush to soda is easily adjusted to personal taste and to control the alcoholic content of the drink. Depending upon how you mix it., slush can be anywhere from a light alcohol frozen punch to a decadent and much more potent cocktail if you serve it in martini glasses with a splash of Prosecco as pictured.

For more information on the benefits of watermelon and some terrific recipe ideas too, be sure to visit Watermelon.org.

Watermelon Sangria Slush

Watermelon Sangria Slush

Watermelon Sangria Slush
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Watermelon Sangria Slush
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
5 mins
Total Time
20 mins
 
Watermelon Sangria Slush - an economical, refreshing and festive cocktail idea that's great for every occasion from Holiday parties to summer barbecues.
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: North American
Servings: 15 to 20 servings or more
Author: Barry C. Parsons
Ingredients
  • 2 cups simple syrup 1 cup sugar/1 cup water
  • 4 cups watermelon cubes diced small
  • 1 ml flask vodka 375 /13oz
  • juice of 2 large lemons
  • juice of 2 large limes
  • 2 cups white wine Pinot Grigio is good or any white wine that isn't too dry
Instructions
  1. First you will need to make the simple syrup so that it can cool down. Simply add the 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water to a small saucepan over low heat and stir constantly until all the sugar is dissolved. The syrup does not have to come to a boil. As soon as no sugar crystals are visible in the bottom of the pan, take it off the heat and let it cool to room temperature.
  2. You will need an airtight covered plastic container to make the slush in, and to store it in the freezer. Airtight is important because this slush can stay in the freezer for quite a long time if need be, and you don't want it absorbing freezer odours. Large tupperware bowls with snap on lids work well. Here in Newfoundland, if we are making large batches, we use food grade plastic buckets that salt beef is sold in. Don't assume a salt beef bucket in a Newfoundland freezer has salt beef!
  3. In any case, this recipe makes about 2 1/2 litres (quartof slush so a 3 litre (quarcontainer will be required.
  4. Dice the watermelon into small cubes, taking out any seeds along the way. Measure 4 cups of these cubes. I squash them down into the measuring cup so that there is little or no airspace between them. You want a full 4 cups of watermelon.
  5. Purée the watermelon in a food processor or blender.
  6. Add the watermelon purée to the plastic container along with the cooled simple syrup and the remaining ingredients.
  7. Give it a good stir to combine, put the lid on and put the container in the freezer for about 6 hours.
  8. After six hours, ice sheets should be beginning to form in the slush. You want to break these down into smaller crystals. An immersion blender is idea for this, but if you don't have one, a few minutes of vigorous stirring with a whisk should do the trick.
  9. Return to the freezer and after a few more hours, give it another stir. The slush then stays covered in the freezer until ready to serve.
  10. When serving, depending on thee size of drink you want to serve, fill the glass from 1/2 to 2/3 full of slush and top up with club soda, ginger ale or lemon lime soda. stir well and serve
  11. Another serving suggestion, as pictured, is to serve the slush in martini glasses mixed with a splash of Prosecco and a garnish of watermelon cubes, green grapes and maraschino cherries.

Rock Recipes is very pleased to have the National Watermelon Promotion Board as sponsor of this recipe post. Compensation was provided in exchange for this recipe post. The opinions expressed are based upon my experience and are entirely my own.

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