Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

Posted on Oct 29 2016 - 12:01pm by Barry C. Parsons

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam – a simple, 3 ingredient recipe that takes advantage of the high pectin content in both partridgeberries or cranberries and apples to make a jam that sets beautifully with very little effort at all.

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

This Partridgeberry Apple Jam is one I have been making all my life really, but thought it was too simple to post as a recipe until I was asked by a reader to do so. Partridgeberries, or Lingonberries, are native to this area and a real favourite of locals. Imagine a smaller, redder, much more tart version of a cranberry. The tart flavour is so intense that it normally requires a lot of sugar to counter it. I’ve always liked mellowing the tart flavour with the addition of apples to the jam because the flavours work so well together and the natural flavour of the partridgeberries still shines through.

Both fruits are very high in natural pectin, so together they make a naturally good jam. Local producers Purity Factories, have used this combination for many many years and this recipe really does remind me of their version.

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Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam

Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam
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Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
45 mins
Total Time
50 mins
 
Partridgeberry Apple Jam or Cranberry Apple Jam - a simple, 3 ingredient recipe that takes advantage of the high pectin content in both partridgeberries or cranberries and apples to make a jam that sets beautifully with very little effort at all.
Course: Jams and Compotes
Cuisine: Newfoundland
Author: Barry C. Parsons
Ingredients
  • 4 cups fresh or frozen partridgeberries or chopped cranberries
  • 3 cups chopped apple (suitable for applesauce like MacIntosh)
  • 2 cups sugar
Instructions
  1. Simmer all the ingredients together slowly over medium-low heat.
  2. Stir the jam occasionally, but as it begins to thicken, stir more often. It will stick to the bottom and possibly burn if unattended. At the end of the cooking time it will require constant stirring.
  3. Cook the jam until practically all of the liquid has boiled off and the jam is quite thick, as shown in the photo above. This will minimize liquid separating from the jam as is quite common with this jam.
  4. Pectin activates with sugar to set at just over 200 degrees F, so if you have a candy or meat thermometer, this can give you a good indication of when it will set very well.
  5. Store in sealed mason jars that have been prepared and processed according to the manufacturers directions to keep your jam for up to a year or so.

 

4 Comments so far. Feel free to join this conversation.

  1. Diana J Coady October 31, 2016 at 1:59 am - Reply

    Love your recipes & they never fail to please. The step by step instructions must surely be a pain for you at times, as you don’t even have to think the process thru-it’s automatic.
    A friend gave me some marshberries, but I’ve never cooked with them before. Would appreciate a recipe for jam or whatever. Would really appreciate it.

    Thank you,
    Diana

  2. Barry C. Parsons November 2, 2016 at 8:28 am - Reply

    You can treat marsh berries exactly as you would cranberries; add them to muffins, coffee cake, etc. I like to mix apple with them in jam exactly the way I do in this Partridgeberry jam recipe.

  3. Jean Aylward April 1, 2017 at 2:59 pm - Reply

    How long in minutes should you cook the jam?

    • Barry C. Parsons April 6, 2017 at 11:57 am - Reply

      There isn’t a specific time. It depends on the liquid level in the fruit. Getting it to the proper consistency is what’s important.

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